Wednesday, March 14, 2018

The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza by Shaun David Hutchinson

On the day Elena finally manages to get up the courage to talk to the girl she has had a crush on, that girl is shot right in front of her.  Elena has always heard voices from inanimate objects so when the Starbucks logo tells her to heal Freddie's gunshot wound, Elena does.  Freddie heals as if she had never been shot and then her killer disappears in a flash of light.  Very few people believe Elena but this is not her first miracle.  In fact, she is already somewhat famous because she is the product of a virgin birth.  It turns out there is a scientific explanation for this, but it is still a miracle.  After the healing Elena hears from several other objects all of which tell her she is the key to saving humans from some unnamed problem and that she is to heal as many people as possible.  The issue is that every time she heals one person, lots of others are "raptured" away, leaving behind devastated friends and families.  She has also attracted the attention of the local police and some secretive government agents.  With the help of her best friend, her former boyfriend, and Freddie, Elena is struggling to figure out what she should do.

I really loved the beginning of this book with the healing and promise of some huge religious or philosophical revelation.  I am gaga about how Elena has a crush on a girl and has an ex-boyfriend and yet there is not a passage talking about her sexuality (until much later in the book in a flashback), she just likes who she likes.  In addition, her friend Fadil is great and I was really enjoying their relationship, his devotion to his religion, and his unconditional support of Elena.  So things were going great!  

And then, things just kinda petered out.  Elena asked for answers from the voices but they did not offer her any explanations.  She discussed her options and problems with various people but didn't form any concrete plan of action and I got tired of watching her just react to the latest thing.  I was particularly unhappy with the quick fade of Fadil from the story as Elena became more involved with Freddie.  The book was just long without much action for a huge chunk of time which I feel is an issue for so many authors - great idea for a premise and then seeming to go not much of anywhere. We are left with unanswered questions about the government agents and really, what, exactly, is happening that necessitated the healing and rapturing in the first place?  Elena finds some solution but I don't feel like there was enough groundwork laid to help us (or me, anyway) understand why people would take the option that was offered.  It feels like there was meant to be a deep message about human weariness or faith but it didn't end up being made clear.

Finally - and this is smallish in terms of the overall story, but it mattered to me - my praise of how a bisexual character was so naturally included in the story was tempered by a later passages/events.  While discussing some classmates the two girls identify one boy Freddie used to like who is now transitioning.  A discussion with another character at another time leads to the revelation that he is questioning and might be asexual.  There are other minor LGBTQ "characters" - I use quotes because we don't actually know most of these people, they are just mentioned in passing.  I'm all for representation but not in a laundry list.  Then it just stands out in a "some of my best friends are not straight" way.  Definitely pulled me out of the story as it was not naturally integrated the way Elena's sexuality was.

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