Saturday, March 3, 2018

The Other Boy by M.G. Hennessey

Shane and his best friend Josh love baseball and their team has a chance to win a tournament this year.  Unfortunately for his team, Shane has to go visit his dad on the same weekend of an important game so he won't be able to help his team win.  Although he doesn't want to let his team down, Shane is excited about his visit back to his former town because he will be seeing his doctor and might be able to begin having testosterone shots to help with his transition.  No one in Shane's new school knows that he was born biologically female but he is still nervous about someone finding out.  What's more, other boys his age are starting to grow hair and are becoming more muscular and Shane doesn't want to be left behind his peers.  But his dreams of beginning the shots are dashed when his dad, who isn't entirely comfortable with this decision, doesn't give his permission.  Back at home, Shane lets slip the name of his former school and the bully who has been harassing him finds a picture of Shane as a girl.  Now he is struggling with his identity again as well as wondering how his friends and girlfriend will react.  

I knew that Shane was a trans boy before beginning the book but I wish I hadn't had that knowledge.  One of the things I liked the best about this is that Hennessey just drops you into Shane's typical middle school boy life - sports, friend, graphic novels, beginnings of romance with a cute girl, bullying - without a word about his biological sex.  When I book talk this to my students, I totally want to find a hook other than his gender because I want my kids to be sucked into Shane's life as a completely "normal" boy before they can bring all their assumptions to bear.  There are a lot of things I like about this book including:
1.  His dad is not all okay with everything right away.  I've said this about several other books with transgendered or gay characters - your loved ones don't always just get it right away.  And even if they're supportive in general, they're gonna make some mistakes and say some stupid things.  It's okay that his dad is struggling to get there as long as he is still working on it.
2.  Because no one at school knows about his past, Shane has kinda convinced himself that he's fine and doesn't need a support group.  But it turns out he's not as all together as he thinks, especially after he is outed at school.  Coming out is a lifetime process as is self-acceptance.
3.  Some people he knows are okay with his revelation and some are not.  Always gonna be that way.  And just like his dad, some of them are supportive but don't really know exactly what to say or how to be supportive without also being awkward.  
4.  There is a little bit of romance - which is typical for a 12 year old boy - but the focus of the book is on Shane's identity in general, not his sexuality.  Sex and orientation are not the same thing but not a lot of people get that.  The other great thing about this point is that when parents come after this book, and some of them will, they won't be able to say that it is inappropriate because middle schoolers don't need to be reading about sex.  The only grounds for objecting to this book is your own personal bigotry and you're basically going to have to expose that in your book challenge.  They'll come up with some other reasons, but that's what's really going to be the reason.
5.  It's really just a story about a boy being bullied for being who he is and him figuring out how to stand up for himself and ignore the bullies.  And it shows that process in a very realistic way with Shane feeling like there's no hope at all to begin with.  It's a good message for my teens to see that you can make it out of the depths of despair back to normal life.  

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