Sunday, August 19, 2018

To Be Honest by Maggie Ann Martin

After her beloved older sister heads off to college, Savvy is left home alone with her diet-crazed mom.   Ever since she was on the reality TV show Shake the Weight, her mom has been obsessed with her own and other's weight and she makes lots of not so subtle suggestions on how Savvy should improve herself.  Savvy is a little chubby but she is usually happy with herself so she mainly tries to stay out of her mom's way but that's going to be more difficult with Shake the Weight coming to the house to film a follow up segment.  Although she tries to be positive, the editors make it appear that Savvy is doing whatever she can to sabotage her mother's progress.  Luckily, Savvy has a new friend, George, who is supportive, cute and funny.  But is he as interested in her as she is finding herself to be in him?

Things I liked:  Savvy.  George.  Their relationship.  The focus of a book with themes of weight being about a person who was too thin rather than overweight. Savvy's ultra-supportive and fun best friend.  The "it's not even worth addressing" fact that her sister is gay.  Portrayal of a character who has panic attacks.  Condemnation of a reality TV show.  Most of the book.

But then.... I was thoroughly enjoying all of this book - even with the typical back and forth of a romantic relationship - up until the last couple of chapters where everything suddenly just ended.  Was the author under a high pressure deadline to wrap it all up?  Threads that were unsatisfactorily concluded for me:

  • Savvy's mom crashes which was not a surprise with the foreshadowing that had been included, but then she goes to the hospital and that's about it.  We hear third hand that she's going to to have spend a couple more weeks somewhere, but there's no real resolution between her and Savvy.  And with her eating disorder, is she suddenly just all better?  That's not usually how such things work.
  • George's problem is his insecurity about getting too attached but he says that and then Savvy says it and now they're all good?  
  • The initial panic attack was nicely written and Savvy mentions having a history of them at other times in the book, but otherwise that issue is dropped.
  • Savvy's article for the newspaper!  She goes to the award ceremony at the end of the book because her article was such a great thing but as readers we see so little of how she got there.  She interviews the coach, they crash a practice, and she talks to a former player.  But we are not let in on the writing and publishing of the article nor on the fallout from it other than a quick mention during the award scene.  George tells her how proud he is because she has worked so hard on it, but I didn't see that hard work, just a few threads that were leading to something explosive.
I wish the conclusion of the book had been as well done as the first three quarters.  The more I reflected on the story, the more unhappy I was with it overall.

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